Forensic Science

BSc (Hons)



Entry 2018

Duration

UCAS code

Location

students can apply

Book a place on our Open Day

Entry requirements

A levels

To include A-level Chemistry minimum grade B.

Please note that where a science A-level is taken, the University will require applicants to pass the practical element (for A-levels awarded from August 2017 onwards).

BTEC Extended Diploma

DMM. Science subject required - must include at least three Chemistry-related units.

Applicants on Access Programmes

112 UCAS tariff points from an Access to Higher Education Diploma - Science subject required. Must include a minimum of 12 credits of Chemistry at minimum Distinction.

International Baccalaureate Requirements

112 UCAS tariff points to include HL Chemistry at grade 6 and 2 other HL subjects at grade 5. Plus HL 3 or SL 4 in Maths and English Language and Literature A or English B.

Plus minimum of

GCSE English, Mathematics and a Science at grade C or 4 (equivalents accepted).

English language requirements

Minimum IELTS at 6.0 or the equivalent.

If you do not meet the IELTS requirement, you can take a University of Bradford pre-sessional English course. See the Language Centre for more details »

CIFS entry requirement

If you are an International student and do not meet the entry requirements for direct entry onto this course you may be interested in our Certificate of International Foundation Studies (CIFS)

80 UCAS points or equivalent (see individual country pages for details) plus Maths and a Science qualification equivalent to GCSE Grade C.

UKVI approved IELTS of 5.0 overall with no sub-test less than 5.0.

CIFS modules to be taken

Students study the four core modules plus

  • Foundation in Chemistry

And ONE additional module from the following:

  • Foundation in Human Biology
  • Introduction to the Social Sciences
  • Global Business Environment
  • Foundation Mathematics 2

Progression requirements for degree programme

An overall average of at least 50% and at least 55% in Foundation in Chemistry

Sandwich year

You can spend a year in a laboratory environment as a paid employee of an approved organisation.

This experience allows you to apply theoretical knowledge to practical problems, learn about work practices, and improve your career prospects.

Learning and assessment

You will learn through a mixture of lectures, seminars, laboratory practicals, workshops, case studies and directed study. Directed study will include directed reading of selected textbooks, specified source literature and open learning materials, directed web-based materials, report writing and other assignments. There will also be an individual project/dissertation.

You will be assessed by written closed-book examinations using constructed (essays, short answers) and selected response (MCQ) questions and a variety of coursework assignments, including laboratory reports, oral presentations and dissertations.

There will also be involvement in laboratory, small-group workshops, case-based work and projects (individual and small group). You will be assessed by critical appraisal, case analysis and critique, case presentations, laboratory reports and dissertations.

At Stage 3, essays, the journal critique and essay-based examinations provide a format to critically evaluate the key themes of the degree. Practical portfolios and worksheets allow you to demonstrate your understanding of forensic laboratory techniques.

The research dissertation develops your ability to undertake independent research and plan this research effectively. Presentations, the witness statement and the mock court exercise will develop your professional oral and written presentation skills.

Facilities

Crime scene investigation and processing is taught through a series of simulated exercises based in our specially appointed Crime Scene Facility.

Forensic Laboratory science is taught from our specialist Forensic Examination Suite and the analytical facilities in the Centre for Chemical and Structural Analysis (including ESEM, FT-Raman,  GC-MS).

Teaching on Forensic Taphonomy is based around lectures and practical classes in our specialist Forensic Taphonomy Laboratory (including autopsy tables, fume extraction and insect colony) and the Oxenhope Taphonomy Field Station.

Archaeological excavation skills are taught during fieldwork over the summer between years 2 and 3.

This is the current course information. Modules and course details may change, subject to the University's programme approval, monitoring and review procedures. The University reserves the right to alter or withdraw courses, services and facilities as described on our website without notice and to amend Ordinances, Regulations, fees and charges at any time. Students should enquire as to the up-to-date position when applying for their course of study.