(Faculty of Engineering and Informatics) Mert Gulcur, Marie Curie Early Stage Researcher at the University of Bradford Skip to content
researcher

Mert Gulcur

Marie Curie Early Stage Researcher

Faculty/Dept/School Department of Mechanical and Energy Systems Engineering
Emailm.gulcur@bradford.ac.uk
Telephone +441274 234583

Biography

Mr Mert Gulcur is a Marie-Curie Fellow at The Centre for Polymer Micro and Nano Technology (Polymer MNT) RKT Centre. He is also enrolled to the full-time PhD programme in Engineering.

Mr Gulcur graduated from Gebze Technical University - Materials Science and Engineering in 2011. He also obtained a minor degree in Physics in 2013. In the same year, he was awarded with a MSc scholarship by German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) to pursue a MSc degree in Germany. He graduated from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) - School of Optics and Photonics in 2013. During his time in Germany, he worked at the Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology and KIT - Institute of Technical Physics.

He started working at the University of Bradford - Polymer MNT in 2017 and he is one of the ESRs for EU funded MICROMAN - H2020 project. His research topic is utilising microinjection moulding and process monitoring solutions for zero-defect manufacturing of microneedle arrays for drug delivery.

Research

Mr Mert Gulcur's experimental activities include but not limited to:

▪ Microinjection moulding for manufacturing micro and nano scale features (diffraction gratings, microneedles, functional surfaces) using a variety of technologies (conventional and ultrasonic)
▪ Process monitoring including thermal and conventional optical imaging, data acquisition interfaces
▪ Surface characterisation using atomic force microscopy, confocal microscopy, scanning electron
microscopy
▪ Mechanical characterisation of polymeric microneedles
▪ Custom built optical imaging systems and quality assurance apparatuses (telecentric and diffraction based quality setups)
▪ Laser machined functional surfaces (anti-bacterial, self-cleaning surfaces and microneedle cavities) and polymer replication