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Biography

My key area of work is in international security. Prior to coming to Bradford, I was Professor of International and European Studies at the University of Reading and subsequently Professor of International Studies at the University of Leeds. While at Kings College London, I worked with Sir Lawrence Freedman and Robert ONeill on the four-nation Nuclear History Programme, before taking up a lectureship in International Relations at the University of Essex. My research focuses on the following sub-areas of my discipline (international relations and security): The study of the proliferation of nuclear weapons in general, the study of the security of the Korean peninsula, the geopolitics of Central Asia and Cold War History. The in the field of nuclear proliferation generally arises from the perception that the failure of the academic community to developwork a coherent analytical framework to explain this phenomenon arises from the development of national security narrative within the academic and policy communities is based on a misperception of the fundamental characteristics of the contemporary international security environment and the historical development of proliferation. This gives rise to a fundamental critique of the established viewpoints and locates the phenomenon of proliferation in the asymmetric diffusion of international norms as opposed to the asymmetric distribution of power. This work is intended to be path-breaking in the sense that it rejects the existing consensus in the academic and policy communities and essentially turns the entire analysis of the phenomenon on its head. It has very far-reaching implications given that the use of military force is widely discussed as a means of countering proliferation and one major war (Iraq) has already ensued. My research focuses on the following sub-areas of my discipline (international relations and security): The study of the proliferation of nuclear weapons in general, the study of the security of the Korean peninsula, the geopolitics of Central Asia and Cold War History. The in the field of nuclear proliferation generally arises from the perception that the failure of the academic community to developwork a coherent analytical framework to explain this phenomenon arises from the development of national security narrative within the academic and policy communities is based on a misperception of the fundamental characteristics of the contemporary international security environment and the historical development of proliferation. This gives rise to a fundamental critique of the established viewpoints and locates the phenomenon of proliferation in the asymmetric diffusion of international norms as opposed to the asymmetric distribution of power. This work is intended to be path-breaking in the sense that it rejects the existing consensus in the academic and policy communities and essentially turns the entire analysis of the phenomenon on its head. It has very far-reaching implications given that the use of military force is widely discussed as a means of countering proliferation and one major war (Iraq) has already ensued.

Research

Julie’s field research consists of excavation in the North Atlantic on projects such as: Old Scatness (1995-present; assistant director & post excavation manager), the Historic Scotland site of Jarlshof (co-director) Undir Junkarinsfløtti (the international Heart of the Atlantic project, involving the Faroese National Museum, City University New York, Durham and Bradford Universities) Viking Unst project (a major initiative with Shetland Amenity Trust for which she is excavation director; funded principally by Heritage Lotteries Fund her team includes researchers from the Universities of Bradford, Durham, Glasgow, CUNY and Stirling) Julie is also a co-investigator in the NSF IPY application ‘Island connections: comparative historical ecology in Faroes, Iceland and Greenland’, (PI McGovern, CUNY). Her lab-based work concentrates on aspects of palaeoeconomy and the social and ritual use of animals. Her research focuses on the following themes: Continuity and change in the subsistence base of settlements in the North Atlantic region The impact of climate and environment and the stability of agrarian strategies in marginal environments. Projects: Pool, Tofts Ness, Old Scatness, Jarlshof, Heart of the Atlantic and Viking Unst. Publications: Bond & MacSween 1998, Bond 1998, Dockrill, Bond & O’Connor 1998, Bond 2002, Bond 2003, Bond, Guttman & Simpson 2004, Bond, Nicholson & Simpson 2005, Turner, Nicholson Dockrill & Bond 2005, Bond, Nicholson & Simpson 2005, Nicholson, Barber & Bond 2005, Hunter, Bond & Smith 2007, Dockrill, Bond, Nicholson & Smith 2007. Research students, Cussans, Wooding (AHRC) Detecting agricultural intensification in the archaeological record Publications: Bond 1998, Bond & O’Connor 1998, Bond 2002, Bond 2003, Bond, Guttman and Simpson 2004, Mulville, Bond & Craig 2005, Bond, Nicholson & Simpson 2005, Dockrill, Bond, Nicholson & Smith 2007, Hunter, Bond & Smith, 2007. Viking settlement in the North Atlantic region and cultural and economic change at the Viking Landnám in the North Atlantic settlements Projects: Pool Old Scatness Jarlshof Viking Unst Heart of the Atlantic Publications: Bond 1998, Bond 2002, Bond 2003, Forster & Bond 2004, Hunter, Bond & Smith 2007. Research students; Redmond (AHRC, 2005), Mustchin, Summers (AHRC) The ritual and symbolic use of animals, especially in funerary practices; the taphonomy and significance of cremated animal bone in archaeological contexts. Projects: Sancton Sutton Hoo Spong Hill Brougham Ingleby Publications: Bond 1996, McKinley & Bond 2001, Bond and Worley 2004, Bond 2005, Bond & Worley 2006, Richards, Beswick, Bond, Jecock, McKinley, Rowland & Worley 2004. Research student Worley (AHRC).