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researcher

Desmond Tobin

Honorary Visiting Professor

Faculty/Dept/School School of Chemistry and Bioscience
(Faculty of Life Sciences)
Emaild.tobin@bradford.ac.uk
Telephone +441274 233585

Biography

Desmond J. Tobin is Professor of Cell Biology and Director of the Centre for Skin Sciences at University of Bradford. He holds a BSc from the National University of Ireland (Maynooth), a PhD from the University of London (St. John’s Institute of Dermatology) and post-doctoral training from New York University Medical School’s Dept. of Dermatology. Over the past 20 years he has researched in basic and applied skin/hair sciences, with a particular focus on the biology of human melanocytes/pigmentation and hair growth disorders (immune based). He is a Fellow of Royal College of Pathologists; Royal Society of Biology, and Institute of Trichologists (Vice-president). He has published over 140 publications and his H-Index is currently 53. Desmond J. Tobin is Professor of Cell Biology and Director of the Centre for Skin Sciences at University of Bradford. He holds a BSc from the National University of Ireland (Maynooth), a PhD from the University of London (St. John’s Institute of Dermatology) and post-doctoral training from New York University Medical School’s Dept. of Dermatology. Over the past 20 years he has researched in basic and applied skin/hair sciences, with a particular focus on the biology of human melanocytes/pigmentation and hair growth disorders (immune based). He is a Fellow of Royal College of Pathologists; Royal Society of Biology, and Institute of Trichologists (Vice-president). He has published over 140 publications and his H-Index is currently 53. Desmond J. Tobin is Professor of Cell Biology and Director of the Centre for Skin Sciences at University of Bradford. He holds a BSc from the National University of Ireland (Maynooth), a PhD from the University of London (St. John’s Institute of Dermatology) and post-doctoral training from New York University Medical School’s Dept. of Dermatology. Over the past 20 years he has researched in basic and applied skin/hair sciences, with a particular focus on the biology of human melanocytes/pigmentation and hair growth disorders (immune based). He is a Fellow of Royal College of Pathologists; Royal Society of Biology, and Institute of Trichologists (Vice-president). He has published over 140 publications and his H-Index is currently 53.

Research

Des’ current research focuses on the biology of skin, the body’s largest organ, and its appendages (e.g., hair follicle). This tissue provides an exceptional opportunity to analyse a highly accessible multi-interactive system of (neuro)ectodermal and mesenchymal cells (e.g., keratinocytes, melanocytes and fibroblasts), and their diverse subpopulations in skin. Regulation of skin and hair follicle pigmentation. Specific projects are currently focused on: POMC peptides in skin and hair follicle pigmentation; Melanocyte aging; Regulation of melanosome transfer from melanocytes to keratinocytes; Melanocyte : mesenchyme interactions in the hair follicle; Autoimmune responses to hair follicles in alopecia areata; Role of the hair follicle mesenchyme in wound healing. Des’ current research focuses on the biology of skin, the body’s largest organ, and its appendages (e.g., hair follicle). This tissue provides an exceptional opportunity to analyse a highly accessible multi-interactive system of (neuro)ectodermal and mesenchymal cells (e.g., keratinocytes, melanocytes and fibroblasts), and their diverse subpopulations in skin. Regulation of skin and hair follicle pigmentation. Specific projects are currently focused on: POMC peptides in skin and hair follicle pigmentation; Melanocyte aging; Regulation of melanosome transfer from melanocytes to keratinocytes; Melanocyte : mesenchyme interactions in the hair follicle; Autoimmune responses to hair follicles in alopecia areata; Role of the hair follicle mesenchyme in wound healing. Des’ current research focuses on the biology of skin, the body’s largest organ, and its appendages (e.g., hair follicle). This tissue provides an exceptional opportunity to analyse a highly accessible multi-interactive system of (neuro)ectodermal and mesenchymal cells (e.g., keratinocytes, melanocytes and fibroblasts), and their diverse subpopulations in skin. Regulation of skin and hair follicle pigmentation. Specific projects are currently focused on: POMC peptides in skin and hair follicle pigmentation; Melanocyte aging; Regulation of melanosome transfer from melanocytes to keratinocytes; Melanocyte : mesenchyme interactions in the hair follicle; Autoimmune responses to hair follicles in alopecia areata; Role of the hair follicle mesenchyme in wound healing. Current Projects Cellular and molecular control of regulation of melanin distribution in skin Impact of glucose metabolism in cutaneous fibroblast cell populations The involvement of adipocyes in cutaneous wound healing Contribution of adipocytes to dermal remodeling in radio-therapy treated skin Bioinformatic approaches to human skin burn assessment Current Projects Cellular and molecular control of regulation of melanin distribution in skin Impact of glucose metabolism in cutaneous fibroblast cell populations The involvement of adipocyes in cutaneous wound healing Contribution of adipocytes to dermal remodeling in radio-therapy treated skin Bioinformatic approaches to human skin burn assessment Current Projects Cellular and molecular control of regulation of melanin distribution in skin Impact of glucose metabolism in cutaneous fibroblast cell populations The involvement of adipocyes in cutaneous wound healing Contribution of adipocytes to dermal remodeling in radio-therapy treated skin Bioinformatic approaches to human skin burn assessment Research Collaborations Internal: Andrew Wilson: Archaeological Sciences. To exploit hair fibre as a bio-resource in forensic and archaeological sciences. Colin Grant & Pete Twigg: Medical Engineering. AFM and skin structure External Ralf Paus (University of Manchester); Rudi Wiesner (University of Cologne); Thomas Reinheckel (University of Freiburg); Andres Ruiz-Linares (UCL); Research Collaborations Internal: Andrew Wilson: Archaeological Sciences. To exploit hair fibre as a bio-resource in forensic and archaeological sciences. Colin Grant & Pete Twigg: Medical Engineering. AFM and skin structure ExterResearch Collaborations Internal: Andrew Wilson: Archaeological Sciences. To exploit hair fibre as a bio-resource in forensic and archaeological sciences. Colin Grant & Pete Twigg: Medical Engineering. AFM and skin structure External Ralf Paus (University of Manchester); Rudi Wiesner (University of Cologne); Thomas Reinheckel (University of Freiburg); Andres Ruiz-Linares (UCL);