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researcher

Chrissie Rogers

Prof of Sociology

Faculty/Dept/School School of Social Sciences
(Faculty of Management, Law and Social Sciences)
Emailc.a.rogers@bradford.ac.uk
Telephone +441274 233874

Biography

I joined Bradford as a Professor of Sociology in September 2017. I graduated from Essex a PhD (ESRC) in Sociology in 2004, after which I took up an ESRC post-doctoral fellowship at Cambridge. The PhD research was with mothers and fathers who have children identified with ‘special educational needs’. I subsequently published this as a monograph with Palgrave in 2007 as Parenting and Inclusive Education. I have previously held academic posts at Aston, Anglia Ruskin, Brunel and Keele. I have published in the areas of mothering, intellectual/learning disability (including ASD and ADHD), care, intimacy, education and have recently published more theoretical/philosophical with Routledge in a monograph called Intellectual Disability and Being Human: A Care Ethics Model. I have also collaborated with Susie Weller, when we edited a book called Critical Approaches to Care: understanding caring relations, identities and cultures. I also have research papers published in, for example, Sexualities, British Journal of Sociology of Education, Disability and Society, Sociological Research Online and Women’s Studies International Forum. Most recently I have completed a Leverhulme Trust research fellowship called Care-less Spaces: Prisoners with learning difficulties and their families. I remain passionate about challenges that impact upon education and learning via social justice and sociological discourse.

Research

Current Projects The most recent research I am working on was funded by The Leverhulme Trust Fellowship (2016/17) (RF-2016-6138), and is called Care-less Spaces: Prisoners with learning difficulties and their families. This has involved carrying out criminal justice qualitative research with adults who have offended and have learning difficulties (LD) and/or social, emotional, mental health problems (SEMH) (that have impacted upon their day to day life), mothers of offenders and professionals who work with these groups of people. I have carried out in-depth life story interviews offenders who were diagnosed with LD/ASD/SEMH problems, mothers with sons who fit within the LD/ASD/SEMH category and professionals who are/or who have worked in LD and/or SEMH forensic/education setting. I gave all participants (excluding the professionals) a disposable camera and encouraged them to use it to record to ‘feelings photographs’ between the first and second interview. Some however chose to take photographs on their camera phones and send them to me via WhatsApp, and in one case, an offender with LD wanted to photocopy his photographs and send them in the post that way. These photographs were to aid our second interview, if they wanted one, to give a visual account of ‘feelings’, as well as attempting to get the participants to reflect upon their everyday feelings. All follow-up interviews were based on questions I had after listening to the first interview and discussions around the photographs. I have also photocopied numerous letters and cards that have been sent to and from prison (from two mothers and sons). The headlines, thematically so far, although I have not analysed the data fully, are clustered around a ‘school to prison pipeline’, high risks of self-harm and suicidal thoughts or attempts, accounts of domestic violence, the enormity of emotional and physical damage for family members, visual sociology/criminology and methodological challenges. As I say, this is just the tip of the iceberg. Clearly, as this research is qualitative, I am unable to make generalisable claims. That said, in the context of criminal justice research, mothering and education, I am able to observe social injustice that occurs and many levels: e.g. socio-politically, emotionally and practically.
Date Role Title / Description Funder Award
01-OCT-00 - 01-OCT-03A sociology of parenting children identified with special educational needs: The private and public spaces parents inhabit
A sociology of parenting children identified with special educational needs: The private and public spaces parents inhabit
Economic and Social Research Council

Professional activities

  • 01-JAN-12: Aston University - Senior Lecturer in Sociology
  • 01-JAN-09: Anglia Ruskin University - Reader in Education, Director of Childhood and Youth Research Institute
  • 01-JAN-08: Brunel University - Lecturer in Social Sciences
  • 01-JAN-05: Keele University - Lecturer in Education Studies
  • 01-JAN-04: University of Cambridge - Post Doctoral Research Fellow (ESRC)
  • 01-JAN-00: University of Essex - Graduate Teaching Assistant

Publications

Peer Reviewed Journal
TitleDisabling a family? Emotional dilemmas experienced in becoming a parent of a child with learning disabilities
AuthorsRogers, Chrissie;
DOI10.1111/j.1467-8578.2007.00469.x
 
TitleNecessary connections: “Feelings photographs” in criminal justice research (2019)
AuthorsRogers, Chrissie
 
TitleCare-less spaces and identity construction: transition to secondary school for disabled children (2017)
AuthorsLithari, E.;Rogers, C.;
JournalChildren's Geographies
DOI10.1080/14733285.2016.1219021
 
Title“I'm complicit and I'm ambivalent and that's crazy”: Care-less spaces for women in the academy (2017)
AuthorsRogers, Chrissie
 
TitleCare-less spaces and identity construction: transition to secondary school for disabled children (2017)
AuthorsLithari, E.; Rogers, Chrissie
 
Title“I'm complicit and I'm ambivalent and that's crazy”: Care-less spaces for women in the academy (2017)
AuthorsRogers, C.;
JournalWomen's Studies International Forum
DOI10.1016/j.wsif.2016.07.002
 
TitleCo-constructed caring research and intellectual disability: An exploration of friendship and intimacy in being human (2016)
AuthorsRogers, C.;Tuckwell, S.;
JournalSexualities
DOI10.1177/1363460715620572
 
TitleIntellectual disability and sexuality:on the agenda? (2016)
AuthorsRogers, Chrissie;
 
TitleIntellectual disability and sexuality: On the agenda? (2016)
AuthorsRogers, C.;
JournalSexualities
DOI10.1177/1363460715620563
 
TitleCo-constructed caring research and intellectual disability: an exploration of friendship and intimacy in being human (2016)
AuthorsRogers, Chrissie; Tuckwell, S.
 
TitleWho gives a damn about intellectually disabled people and their families? Care-less spaces personified in the case of LB (2015)
AuthorsRogers, Chrissie;
 
TitleMothering and ‘insider’ dilemmas: feminist sociologists in the research process (2015)
AuthorsCooper, L.; Rogers, Chrissie
 
TitleInclusive education and intellectual disability: a sociological engagement with Martha Nussbaum (2013)
AuthorsRogers, Chrissie
JournalInternational Journal of Inclusive Education
PublisherTaylor and Francis
DOIhttps://tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13603116.2012.727476
 
TitleInclusive education and intellectual disability: A sociological engagement with Martha Nussbaum (2013)
AuthorsRogers, C.;
JournalInternational Journal of Inclusive Education
DOI10.1080/13603116.2012.727476
 
TitleInclusive education, exclusion and difficult difference: A call for humanity? (2012)
AuthorsRogers, C.;
JournalBritish Journal of Sociology of Education
DOI10.1080/01425692.2012.664915
 
TitleMothering and intellectual disability:partnership rhetoric? (2011)
AuthorsRogers, Chrissie;
DOI10.1080/01425692.2011.578438
 
Title‘But it’s not all about the sex: mothering, normalisation and young learning disabled people’ (2010)
AuthorsRogers, Chrissie
JournalDisability and Society
PublisherTaylor and Francis
DOIhttps://tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09687590903363365
 
Title(S)excerpts from a life told: Sex, gender and learning disability (2009)
AuthorsRogers, Chrissie
JournalSexualities
PublisherSage
DOIhttp://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1363460709103891
 
TitleExperiencing an ‘inclusive’ education: parents and their children with ‘special educational needs’ (2007)
AuthorsRogers, Chrissie
JournalBritish Journal of Sociology of Education
PublisherTaylor and Francis
DOIhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0142569600996659