(Faculty of Management, Law and Social Sciences) Andy Bateman, Lecturer in Counselling Service at the University of Bradford Skip to content

Andy Bateman

Lecturer in Counselling Service

Faculty/Dept/School School of Social Sciences
Emaila.bateman@bradford.ac.uk
Telephone +441274 234790

Biography

Associate Member of the Higher Education Academy, Associate Member of the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy, Diploma in Counselling, Post-Graduate Certificate in Education.   Andy Bateman followed successful and wide-ranging careers in education and in residential social work including innovative work with substance abusers and their families before training as a counsellor in 2001. Since then he’s practiced as a counsellor consistently alongside teaching, training and consultancy work. As a counsellor he’s worked with a wide range of client groups and in a wider range of settings. Initially a volunteer working with male survivors of sexual abuse, in H.M. Prison and Young Offenders Institution, Andy Bateman later worked in school counselling, college counselling, work with addicts in recovery in a community based drug rehabilitation project, as a staff counsellor to a large local authority and currently works one day each week at the Interchange Project in Sheffield, with young people from 11 to 25 years old.   In parallel with counselling Andy Bateman has an ongoing commitment to sharing insights from counselling ant therapy through training and writing. He’s taught counselling since two years after qualification, from elementary to diploma level, acted as organisational consultant to voluntary organisations,, and delivered training to police, social workers and other professionals, most recently teaching self-care to professionals working with young people across Sheffield.   Alongside these activities Andy Bateman has interests in several areas of theory and philosophy surrounding counselling. He has an ongoing interest in Palestine, particularly the effect of the occupation and the Israeli apartheid regime on mental health and the practice of therapy amongst Palestinian adults and children- especially the idea of practicing therapy in an environment where there is no safe space. He’s currently researching phronesis, the philosophy of interpersonal skill; writing about transgender and its implications for the philosophy and practice of counselling; co-editing a book on trans gender in the criminal justice system and has an interest in how we experience and understand empathy, particularly in the counselling practice room.