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Dr Pam Ramsden

PositionLecturer in Psychology
LocationRichmond Building, Room E7
DepartmentPsychology
Feedback HoursWednesdays 09:00-11:00 and Thursdays 09:00-10:00
Telephone+44 (0)1274 235542
EmailP.Ramsden@bradford.ac.uk

Research Interests (key words only)

My research interests are in clinical/counselling psychology, neuropsychology and health psychology to balance things out. Specific topics are: psychopathology, terrorism, personality disorders, self harm, abnormal psychology, counselling activities (assessment, interventions, training and psychological education), vocational psychology, brain damage, life after brain injury, trauma, resiliency, bereavement, terminal illness and end of life issues.

Research Areas

I am specifically interested in researching the relationship of psychological resiliency, vicarious post traumatic stress disorder and fear of terrorism/violence. Another element of this project is to identify whether psychological resiliency can insulate us from the psychological anxiety that is caused by fear and if this construct can be incorporated into the psychological well-being of an individual. One specific area is the t 24-hour news coverage on television and radio, printed material and the internet allows terroristic acts to receive focused attention and the more horrific and devastating the act of crime or terrorism is the more media coverage it receives. Although individuals are not directly involved in the trauma, I am interested in the psychological effects of these images and vicarious post-traumatic stress and terrorism.

Publications

  • Ramsden, P. (2013). Understanding Abnormal Psychology: Clinical and Biological Perspectives. Sage.
  • Ramsden, P., Matthews, P, Xuereb, S. & Thornton, A. (2013). The Design and construction of the psychological practicum. Workshop presented to the British Psychological Society Annual Conference, Harrogate.
  • Ramsden, P. (2008). Vicarious Traumatization: Does media coverage impact our lives causing vicarious PTSD. Paper presented to the British Psychological Society Annual conference. Brighton.

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