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Dr Srimant Tripathy

PositionSenior Lecturer (University of Bradford) and Adjunct Associate Professor (University of Houston)
LocationG35, Richmond building
DepartmentBradford School of Optometry and Vision Sciences
Telephone+44 (0) 1274 235588
EmailS.P.Tripathy@bradford.ac.uk

Research Interests (key words only)

visual perception, crowding, motion perception, tracking, attention and memory, spatial vision, temporal vision

Teaching and Supervisory Responsibilities

  • Co-module leader (with Dr. William McIlhagga): Clinical Methodology and Statistics

Administrative Responsibilities

  • Journal Club Coordinator

Study History

Srimant graduated from Anna University (Chenai, India) in 1984 with a B.E. in Electronics and Communications.

He then studied at the University of Houston where he completed an M.S. in Computer Science in 1988 and a PhD in Physiological Optics in 1994 (supervisor - Prof. Dennis Levi).

Professional History

He was at the Physiological Laboratory, Cambridge University until 1998, first as Research Associate and then as Senior Research Associate with Prof. Horace Barlow.

He then joined the University of Bradford as Lecturer. He has been a Senior Lecturer since 2011.  Since 2005 he is also Adjunct Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Houston.

Research Areas

Srimant's primary research interest is visual perception, particularly with regard to blind spots, crowding, motion perception, tracking, attention and memory.

Much of his current research is focused on Multiple Object Tracking, Crowding and on Correspondence Noise in Kinematograms.

Post-graduate students (past and present):

  • Duong Huynh (co-supervised by Prof. Haluk Ogmen; motion perception and multiple object tracking; University of Houston; PhD; current)
  • Syed Nadeemullah Shafiullah (co-supervised by Dr. Mike Cox; correspondence noise; University of Bradford; PhD; graduated 2008)
  • Ozgur Yilmaz (co-supervised by Prof. Haluk Ogmen; motion perception and multiple object tracking; University of Houston; PhD; graduated 2007)
  • Sathyasri Narasimhan (co-supervised by Dr. Brendan Barrett; motion perception and multiple object tracking, University of Bradford; PhD; graduated 2006)
  • Onur Ekiz (co-supervised by Prof. Haluk Ogmen; motion perception and multiple object tracking, University of Houston; MS; graduated 2011)
  • Christopher Shooner (co-supervised by Prof. Haluk Ogmen; motion perception and multiple object tracking, University of Houston; MS; graduated 2009)

Research Collaborations

Collaborations include:

  • Prof. Harold Bedell (University of Houston; motion perception and multiple object tracking)
  • Prof. Patrick Cavanagh (Université Paris Descartes; crowding)
  • Prof. Haluk Ogmen (University of Houston; motion perception and multiple object tracking)
  • Dr. Brendan Barrett (University of Bradford; multiple object tracking)
  • Dr. Michael Cox (University of Bradford; motion perception)
  • Dr. Christina Howard (Nottingham Trent University; multiple object tracking)
  • Dr. Sathyasri Narasimhan (University of British Columbia; multiple object tracking)
  • Dr. Syed Nadeemullah Shafiullah (motion perception)
  • Dr. Ozgur Yilmaz (National Research Center for Magnetic Resonance (UMRAM), Ankara; multiple object tracking)

Publications

  • Ogmen, H., Ekiz, O., Huynh, D., Bedell, HE, Tripathy SP. Bottlenecks of motionprocessing during a visual glance. PLOS ONE 8(12): e83671, 2013
  • Tripathy SP, Shafiullah SN, Cox MJ. Influence of correspondence noise and spatial scaling on the upper limit for spatial displacement in fully-coherent random-dot kinematogram stimuli. PLoS ONE 2012
  • Tripathy SP, Howard CJ. Multiple-trajectory tracking. Scholarpedia 7(4): 11287, 2012
  • Yilmaz O, Tripathy SP, Ogmen H. Misperceptions in the trajectories of objects undergoing curvilinear motion. PLoS ONE 7(5): e36511, 2012
  • Tripathy SP, Ogmen H, Narasimhan S. Multiple-object tracking: a serial attentional process? In C Mole, D Smithies, W Wu (Eds.), Attention: Philosophical & Psychological Essays (pp. 117-144), Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011
  • Shooner C, Tripathy SP, Bedell HE, Ogmen H. High-capacity, transient retention of direction-of-motion information for multiple moving objects. Journal of Vision 10(6): Article No. 8, 2010
  • Kennedy GJ, Tripathy SP, Barrett BT. Early age-related decline in the effective number of trajectories tracked in adult human vision. Journal of Vision 9(2): Article No. 21, 2009
  • Narasimhan S, Tripathy SP, Barrett BT. Loss of positional information when tracking multiple moving dots: the role of visual memory. Vision Research 49(1): 10-27, 2008
  • Tripathy SP, Levi DM. On the effective number of tracked trajectories in amblyopic human vision. Journal of Vision 8(4): Article No. 8, 2008
  • Yilmaz O, Tripathy SP, Patel SS, Ogmen H. Attraction of flashes to moving dots. Vision Research 47(20): 2603-2615, 2007
  • Tripathy SP, Narasimhan S, Barrett BT. On the effective number of tracked trajectories in normal human vision. Journal of Vision 7(6): Article No 2, 2007
  • Levi DM, Tripathy SP. Is the ability to identify deviations in multiple trajectories compromised by amblyopia? Journal of Vision 6(12): 1367-1379, 2006
  • Tripathy SP, Barrett BT. Misperceptions of trajectories of dots moving through the blind spot. Perception 35(1): 137-142, 2006
  • Tripathy SP, Barrett BT. Severe loss of positional information when detecting deviations in multiple trajectories. Journal of Vision, 4(12): 1020-1043, 2004
  • Tripathy SP, Barrett BT. Gross misperceptions in the perceived trajectories of moving dots. Perception 32(11): 1403-1408, 2003
  • Tripathy SP, Cavanagh P. The extent of crowding in peripheral vision does not scale with target size. Vision Research 42(20): 2357-2369, 2002
  • Tripathy SP, Levi DM. Looking behind a pathological blind spot in human retina. Vision Research 39(11): 1917-1925, 1999
  • Tripathy SP, Mussap AJ, Barlow HB. Detecting collinear dots in noise. Vision Research 39(25): 4161-4171, 1999
  • Baddeley R, Tripathy SP. Insights into motion perception by observer modeling. Journal of the Optical Society of America A – Optics, Image Science and Vision 15(2): 289-296, 1998
  • Barlow HB, Tripathy SP. Correspondence noise and signal pooling in the detection of coherent visual motion. Journal of Neuroscience 17(20): 7954-7966, 1997
  • Plant GT, Tripathy SP. Effect on vision of binocular foveal contour interactions. Lancet 349(9061): 1296-1297, 1997
  • Levi DM; Tripathy SP. Localization of a peripheral patch: the role of blur and spatial frequency. Vision Research 36(23): 3785-3803, 1996
  • Tripathy SP, Levi DM, Ogmen H. Two-dot alignment across the physiological blind spot. Vision Research 36(11): 1585-1596, 1996
  • Tripathy SP, Levi DM, Ogmen H, Harden C. Perceived length across the physiological blind spot. Visual Neuroscience 12(2): 385-402, 1995
  • Durgin FH, Tripathy SP, Levi DM. On the filling in of the blind spot – some rules of thumb. Perception, 24(7): 827-840, 1995. [Reprinted in AM Surprenant, G Francis, I Neath (Eds.) Coglab Reader (pp. 137-149), Belmont: Thomson Wadsworth, 2005.]
  • Tripathy SP, Levi DM. Long-range dichoptic interaction in the human visual-cortex in the region of the blind spot. Vision Research 34(9): 1127-1138, 1994
  • Kooi FL, Toet A, Tripathy SP, Levi DM. The effect of similarity and duration on spatial interaction in peripheral vision. Spatial Vision 8(2): 255-279, 1994

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