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Dr Dan Seddoh

DBA

Dr Dan Seddoh

As a Chartered Accountant and a finance person, the Doctorate of Business Administration was very attractive to me because it is deeply rooted in professional practice.  It was presented to me as an attractive innovative and topic-driven postgraduate qualification. The practical nature of the Doctorate in Business Administration (DBA) made it more attractive than the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) and with hindsight, I can say with certainty that I have no regret for choosing the DBA over the PhD.

The program has equipped me with the most complete and up-to-date knowledge and understanding of both general management and my specialist area. The real deal from the DBA is the acquisition of lifelong skills of learning to learn through reflection, research, and the review of appropriate materials.

After my DBA, I got appointed to the high profile job of the Chief Executive Officer of the National Pensions Regulatory Authority but my sense of self-discovery made me resign from this job after a year to pursue my dream. I currently serve as a non-executive director on the Boards of reputable companies and also discharge my duty as an adjunct lecturer at the Graduate Business School.  

What is more exciting to me is that, today, I have discovered that I am in the business of trying to make sense out of business life and communicating my conclusions to the next generational leaders in the simplest possible manner. Thanks to my training from Bradford – making knowledge work.

I met very pleasant people on the DBA program. I can readily mention my cohort, my supervisor - Professor Sandra Hogarth-Scott and Eva Niemann. These people contributed in diverse ways to help me discover the ultimate in life – knowing who I am. I can thankfully say I now do things that suit my personality and I am at peace with myself.

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Latest blog posts:

28 September - How can your business take advantage of your local university?


26 September - My CPS Work Experience


20 September - The rise of psychometric testing is harming workplace diversity