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Gallery II

Timecode (formely Visual Methods Group)

About

A seminar series on arts media and visual culture

Run jointly by the Communication Culture and Media and Health Studies research groups at the University of Bradford, this regular seminar series explores the increasingly important relationship between arts, media, technology, culture and society. Bradford has a long tradition of operating across artistic and scientific academic disciplines and is expanding its creative portfolio.

All seminars are FREE and begin at 6pm, University of Bradford, West Yorkshire, BD7 1DP.

http://www.brad.ac.uk/contact-and-find-us

For more information on the series contact: Mark Goodall (m.goodall@bradford.ac.uk) Tel +44 (0)1274 236071 

http://www.bradford.ac.uk/ei/media-design-technology/research/communication-culture-media/timecode-seminars/?s=51

Vernacular Media and Everyday Memory

Emily Keightley and Michael Pickering

Wednesday 16 March, 6pm, John Stanley Bell lecture theatre, University of Bradford

The aim of this talk is to address a gap in existing studies of media and everyday life. While the role of media in everyday experience has been a key concern for media studies, it is common for only one communications medium to be considered at a time, or for media in general to be discussed, resulting in either narrow or excessively broad treatments of the ways in which media are intertwined in the practices and processes of lived experience. In our research we have taken two technologies - photography and recorded music - together in order to explore their distinctive and complementary features in vernacular remembering. We do so via the concept of the mnemonic imagination.  This concept is designed to illuminate the interaction of memory and imagination. It shows how both memory and imagination are vital in maintaining the dynamic interplay between past, present and future in everyday life. In the seminar we will apply the concept to examples from our ethnographic fieldwork. These examples will address three distinct phases of the distillation of experience which together constitute the process of everyday remembering: the localising and integration of cultural resources into remembering practices; the use of photography and recorded music in the process of congealing experience into recognisable and communicable units and patterns and putting these to work in the story of a life; and the final distillation of lived experience in which value and significance is invested in relatively stable ensembles of experience which communicate the meaning of a life to self and others.

Dr Emily Keightley is Senior Lecturer in Communication and Media Studies at Loughborough University, UK. Emily’s main research interest is memory, time and its mediation in everyday life. She is particularly concerned with the role of media in the relationship between individual, social and cultural memory. Emily’s research explores the roles of photography and phonography in the articulation of everyday memory and the gendered nature of mnemonic experience. She is the author or editor of four books and twenty-five journal articles or chapters.

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/socialsciences/staff/academicandresearch/keightley-emily.html

Professor Michael Pickering is Professor of Media and Cultural Analysis at Loughborough University, UK. Michael’s work covers a number of areas including popular music, racism and popular culture, imperialism and theatrical history, Mass Observation, working-class writing, news and documentary, stereotyping and representation, humour and comedy, creativity and cultural production, media and memory, and historical hermeneutics. He has also written extensively on research methods, having edited collections on methods in cultural studies and memory studies. He has published eighteen books as author or editor, and has written over one hundred articles and chapters.

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/socialsciences/staff/pickering-michael.html

Psychedelia: Futurist Routes and Nostalgic Roots 

Rob Chapman

Wednesday 24 February, 6pm, D0.23 Horton Building, University of Bradford

Rob Chapman is the author of a new book Psychedelia and Other Colours published by Faber. Rob is currently the holder of a Royal Literary Fund Fellowship at the University of Lancaster. He was for a long time a regular contributor to Mojo magazine and has also written for The Times, Guardian, Independent on Sunday, Uncut, Word and the dance music fanzine Jockey Slut. He is the author of Selling the Sixties: The Pirates and Pop Music Radio (1992), The Vinyl Junkyard (1996) and the acclaimed biography Syd Barrett: A Very Irregular Head (2010). His novel Dusk Music was published in 2008. He has compiled and written sleevenotes for CD reissues by artists as varied as The Last Poets and John Fahey, as well as numerous psychedelia and loungecore compilations. He lives in Todmorden, Lancashire.

TIMECODE 

A seminar series on arts media and visual culture

Run jointly by the Communication Culture and Media and Health Studies research groups at the University of Bradford, this regular seminar series explores the increasingly important relationship between arts, media, technology, culture and society. Bradford has a long tradition of operating across artistic and scientific academic disciplines and is expanding its creative portfolio.

All seminars are FREE and begin at 6pm, University of Bradford, West Yorkshire, BD7 1DP.

http://www.brad.ac.uk/contact-and-find-us

'Critical Conditions'

Phillip Bergson

A survey of the changing role of the film critic today - champion of quality cinema or responsible for some red faces on the red carpets? 

Wednesday 18 November, 6pm, John Stanley Bell Lecture Theatre, Richmond Building, University of Bradford

Timecode flyer 2


Patrick O'Sullivan 'Not all who wander are lost: the rescue of "Tolkien in Oxford"'

Wednesday 28th October, 6pm - John Stanley Bell lecture theatre, Richmond Building

part of 

TIMECODE a seminar series on arts media and visual culture

Timecode flyer

Visual Methods Special Interest Group: Wednesday, 20th May 2015


Gallery II, University of Bradford, 3.30-5pm

Refreshments provided 

Art as a Tool for Reflection, Liz Whitney 

Liz is a Lecturer and programme Leader in the Faculty of Health Studies, School of Midwifery and Reproductive Health, who has used a variety of visual arts methods for encouraging reflection in the personal and professional education of students. This will be a hands-on session that provides a variety of ideas about how you can adopt this approach in your own learning, teaching and/or research.

Interactive Workshop 

  • Very brief intro into using art in education
  • Guided relaxation and meditation on an individual event
  • Art activity
  • Sharing and exploring artworks
  • Group discussion

Close

Visual Methods Special Interest Group: Wednesday, 22nd April, 2015 

Room 3.03, Faculty of Health Studies, Horton A, University of Bradford, 3.30-5pm 

visual methods - april

Analysing protest imagery: the immediate, mediated and mediatized  

Giorgia Aiello and Katy Parry, School of Media and Communication, University of Leeds.

This talk will draw on the example of Pussy Riot to explore how the bodily reclamation of public spaces and the subsequent circulation of re-presentations of such activities across diverse media platforms provide opportunities for activists to announce an alternative way of being. By examining Pussy Riot's iconic performances, we will map the three key communicative spaces of protest imagery: the immediate; mediated; and mediatized (albeit recognising these also have slippages). In doing this, we will also insist on recognising the embedded or situated nature of the images and the visuality offered in different media platforms and actions on the ground.

For directions, or to be added to the mailing list, please contact Andrea Capstick

a.j.capstick@bradford.ac.uk  01274 235192

Wednesday, 4th March 2015

Acid House Memories: Photo-elicitation, nostalgia and postmodern leisure

Ronnie Richards, Leeds Beckett University

Gallery II, University of Bradford, 3.30-5pm

Refreshments provided

Ronnie Richards is an Associate Lecturer in the Carnegie Faculty at Leeds Beckett University. His studies seek to contextualise the leisure experiences of individuals who participated in the UK Acid House subcultural moment which began circa 1988. His work is concerned with the use of photo elicitation, artefacts and music to evoke memory and nostalgia in the context of individual and group identities, the importance of embodiment and the changing intersection of social constructs such as ‘race’ and class.

This will be an interactive session with plenty of opportunities for discussion.

For directions, or to be added to the mailing list, please contact Andrea Capstick

a.j.capstick@bradford.ac.uk  01274 235192

visual methods group -march

 

 Visual methods group - feb

Wednesday, 11th February 2015

Gallery II, University of Bradford, 3.30-5pm

Refreshments provided 

Reading the image in public space: cloth and context 

Sonja Andrew, University of Manchester

Dr. Sonja Andrew is a Lecturer in Design, and Programme Director for the Master of Research in Materials and Surface Design at the University of Manchester.  Her main research interests focus on textile semantics and communication, exploring multi-modality through visual and tactile communication on cloth, the textile artefact as a signifying object, and the influence of context on audience perception.

This will be an interactive session with plenty of opportunities for discussion. 

http://www.ahrc.ac.uk/News-and-Events/Image-Gallery/Pages/A-textile-narrative-of-John-Edgar-Bell.aspx


Visual Methods Special Interest Group: Wednesday, 21st January 2015

visual methods group image

Gallery II, University of Bradford, 3.30-5pm

Refreshments provided 

Art as a Tool for Reflection, Liz Whitney 

Liz is a Lecturer and programme Leader in the Faculty of Health Studies, School of Midwifery and Reproductive Health, who has used a variety of visual arts methods for encouraging reflection in the personal and professional education of students.  This will be a hands-on session that provides a variety of ideas about how you can adopt this approach in your own learning, teaching and/or research.

Interactive Workshop 

  • Very brief intro into using art in education
  • Guided relaxation and meditation on an individual event
  • Art activity
  • Sharing and exploring artworks
  • Group discussion
  • Close

2013-2014 (sessions one, two, three and 'special session')

2014-2015 (from session four onwards)


Session Five

Wed 3 Dec 15.30-17.00, Gallery II, free and all welcome

Paul Wilson - Tolerable Comprehension: landscape embodying scription, language remaking the world

The talk will focus on the relationship between words and place and between designed words and images of place. It focuses on the town of Keighley in West Yorkshire and the role the town has played in an history of how we linguistically-mediate knowledge. The presentation centres on an ongoing practice-as-research project which makes use of visual methods of collection and analysis to explore notions of ‘writing out’ and ‘writing on’ place - typographic processes which seek to reveal histories, memories and narratives, and reveal how landscapes can embody particular acts of inscription.

Paul Wilson copy

Biography:  Paul is a Lecturer in the School of Design at the University of Leeds. His research activities are located firmly within design and visual communication: in particular, aspects of typography and typographic design. They centre on a conceptual reorientation of typographic process and practice, investigating the relationships between typography, writing and aspects of everyday life. Research activities explore (designed) narratives of community and place and often focus on sites of situated class experience and knowledge at moments or points of transition, decay or termination.

Screening: From Frenchgate Mall to Fishpond LaneWe will also show a short film of a walking interview with Dennis Jubb, MBE a lifelong trade union activist, who was diagnosed with dementia at the age of 59 and went on to found the People Relying on People (PROP) support group in Doncaster.


Session Four

Wed 12 Nov 15.30-1700, Gallery II, free and all welcome

Patrick Allen  -  Literacies, visual or otherwise

Literacy is used in many circles and especially in education to indicate a range of different competencies and the use of tools and representations in communication processes. In this talk, the concept of Visual Literacy is developed in detail and used to provide a critique and a context for the consideration of other forms of literacy, in particular, technological and media literacies are investigated. Examples from learning and teaching activities in creative design and media production courses at the University of Bradford will be provided as evidence and used as an integral part of this research.

Andrea Capstick - Changing places:  photo-elicitation with people with dementia

This presentation looks at the subjectively piercing aspect of a photographic image which Roland Barthes described as the ‘punctum’. Barthes identifies the punctum - as opposed to the ‘studium’, or subject of the photograph - as that focus point within an image that has emotional force and resonance precisely because it has ‘ceased to be’ in external, material reality. The connections between photography, emotional memory, identity and place will be explored through a selection of still images taken from visual research with ten people with dementia living in a long-term care environment.

Visual Methods 2


Special Session

Memories on Film

Private Screening

April 2 2014 from 1-4pm at the University of Bradford, refreshments provided.

At this event we will showcase a series of short films co-produced with residents at a Methodist Housing Care Centre in Leeds. The films are part of an 18-month research study funded by the National Institute for Health Research which looks at the benefits of participatory film-making for people with memory problems living in long-term care.

Visual Methods Group


Session Three

Wednesday 5 February 15-16.30 Gallery II

Close Your Eyes: Multisensory Approaches to 'Visual Culture'

Dr Ian Hague will present on multisensory approaches to visual culture following the publication of his book Comics and the Senses: A multisensory Approach to Comics and Graphic Novels. Although we often speak of 'visual culture' in reference to literature, art and film, it is important to remember that these forms also appeal to senses other than sight as well. In some cases, such as film and videogames, this is fairly obvious, and the incorporation of aural and tactile aspects is a subject of some discussion. In others, such as literary studies, the multisensory elements of media are less obvious and have only begun to gain attention relatively recently as part of a broader shift towards sensory theory in the humanities. When books go digital, for example, people often speak about losing the sensory pleasures of the printed book: the smell of the paper and the texture of the cover. In this talk, Dr Ian Hague will use examples from comic strips and graphic novels, forms that have long been understood to be exclusively visual in nature, to consider what sensory aspects of the media can tell us about the communication systems that authors and producers employ, and how understanding the non-visual aspects of 'visual culture' can improve our awareness of the contexts of reception as well.


Session Two

Wednesday 11 December 15-16.30 Gallery II

Charlie Meecham – Computing, Informatics, and Media; University of Bradford - will talk about his project, DodoQuest http://dodoquest.wordpress.com/about/:

“….I would like to talk about a research project that I have undertaken which explores all things subjective to do with the Dodo. I don't want to spoil it by saying too much but I'm really fascinated by the way in which the story of the demise of this famous bird has become so embedded in our culture and the implications surrounding our scant rather anecdotal knowledge (or not). My research is perhaps better described as a quest. I hope that this may produce some interesting responses from the audience to help me on this journey....”


Session One

Wednesday 6 November 16-18:00 Gallery II

Our first gathering of the semester will be a double bill exploring the theme of the uncanny (or unheimlich). How can visual methods capture, translate, or even create, that sense of the disturbingly familiar or the ordinary made strange, which we call the uncanny?

Dr Mark Goodall will screen and discuss his film 'The Happy Children' which is based on a short story by the supernatural writer Arthur Machen. Read the text in advance here: http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/m/machen/arthur/holy-errors/chapter11.html. Mark will address the issues raised when adapting written texts into moving pictures and the difficulties with convincingly representing something as mysterious as 'the uncanny'.

Dr Andrea Capstick will show and discuss a series of photographs taken in day centres and residential care homes, from her collection titled 'Alzheimlich'. Rather than focussing on human subjects, these photographs attempt to express something of the uncanny, and the liminal, in such environments through juxtaposed images of homely/unhomely objects and vistas.